Red Road rubble now latest tourist attraction

October 15, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

The remains of the six tower blocks on Red Road which were blown down on Sunday are now attracting tourists. Nicknamed – the Leaning Towers of Petershill – the two fragments of buildings still standing with ten or more floors intact, are being widely photographed.

Holding up the Leaning Tower of Petershill. Pic by Dr Helen Murray and Catriona Fraser.

Holding up the Leaning Tower of Petershill.
Pic by Dr Helen Murray and Catriona Fraser.

Dr Helen Murray and her friend Catriona Fraser came from Aberdeen specially to see the mounds of rubble. From Glasgow originally, Helen said: ‘You knew you were home when you saw the Red Road flats on the horizon. My mother has asked me to bring her here to see the site even although she’s never been on this side of the city.’

The  two friends have toured the country taking fun shots of different places and people – including tennis star Andy Murray.

Local residents in the Red Road exclusion area were – mostly – back to normal. Said Margaret Finlay, a family support worker at the Tron St Mary Church of Scotland on Red Road: ‘It was back to work on Monday. There wasn’t a lot of inconvenience.’ The Church’s community allotments had been covered with black tarpaulins to protect the vegetables and other plants from the dust. And the  Sunday service had been held in Springburn Church along with that congregation.

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Black covers (lying below the cross) protected the Tron St Mary’s community gardens. The freshly painted building will celebrate 50 years of service from Saturday 17 October.

Bonnybroom Nursery which was possibly the closest building to the demolition site, was open on Monday as usual. Glasgow City Council was asked by the head teacher to put out a tweet to that effect.

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Bonnybroom Nursery School was open as usual on Monday.

The senior citizens’ Alive and Kicking building on Red Road and the Family Centre next door were all still being cleaned up today (Thursday 15 October)  before expecting to re-open soon.

Contractor Safedem is using high-reach machinery to dismantle 123 Petershill Drive. The work will involve weakening the steel frame enough to enable it to be brought down to ground level under controlled conditions. A safe exclusion zone within the site has been set up so that parts of the structure can be dismantled safely. The exclusion zone also includes a buffer zone for debris.

A GHA spokesman said: ‘Although two of the blocks did not fall exactly as predicted on Sunday, all blocks are now at a height that the demolition can be completed as planned. The contractor is now dismantling the remaining floors of the blocks. This work will be carried out under strict health and safety conditions and with minimum disruption to residents.’

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Mechanical demolition has begun on the remaining structures.

While reports from various residents alluded to burst water pipes, broken locks, washing machines stopping working, no one spoken to had actually experienced any back lash from the major blow-down on Sunday.

The six blocks were built in the late 1960s. Designed by architect Sam Bunton, they cost £6 million.  The cost of demolition has not been revealed by Glasgow Housing Association (GHA) which is part of the Wheatley Group and owns the iconic properties.

 

Blow down not such a breeze

October 11, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

After the blow down, parts of two of the tower blocks are still visible.

After the blow down, parts of two of the tower blocks are still visible.

All six of the infamous Red Road high flats were ‘blown down’ today but remnants of two of them remained after the explosion.  Hours after the event, no one at Glasgow Housing Association (GHA) was able to comment on whether this was intended or not. Nor did the social landlord – part of the Wheatley Group – release the normal details of how much explosive was used, how many tonnes of rubble would be created etc.

One insider, however, said that the steel structure of the building was such that four times the normal amount of explosive would have been used and the two bits of building remaining standing would have been ‘not expected.’

And by early evening it was understood that hundreds of people were being advised to ‘look at the GHA website’ to see where they might spend the night if they were unable to return to their homes because of the unsafe, remaining structures.

An emergency inspection was believed to be underway as this story

The six tower blocks before demolition.

The six tower blocks before demolition.

is being written.

Local people in their hundreds stood at various vantage points for hours to wait for the massive implosion. They were well pleased.  Cheers and a round of applause accompanied the massive cloud of dust which followed the collapse of the blocks. The dust spread over a very wide area.

Said trainee photographer Joe Graham: ‘That was quick!’ as he scrolled through his images.

Local resident Joan Flanagan said: ‘That was magic. I like big bangs and love to see things being destructed like that.’

Bobby Burns, also a local resident said: ‘That’s bitter sweet to see. It is one chapter of life closed now. But I suppose it opens a new one of re-generation for the area.’  He said he’d lived in two different tower blocks and commented: ‘They’ve both gone now. They were blown down too.’

The huge operation to clear the surrounding area of people began early on Sunday morning. ‘Two thousand five hundred people had to be moved,’ said one GHA official spokesman. ‘That takes time.’

Some resistance was expected from one householder – Tina Suffredini who chairs the local residents’ association. But when the time came, the GHA’s ‘plan B’ to have Sheriff Officers physically remove the lady from her property, was not required and she left her home of her own accord.

MSP Patricia Ferguson at the viewing site before demolition.

MSP Patricia Ferguson at the viewing site before demolition.

MSP Patricia Ferguson, who spent 11 years of her early girlhood in one of the Red Road flats said: ‘These needed to come down. I hope the new developments will bring job opportunities and community facilities and the GHA is consulting with local people to do that.’