A flaming good idea for Christmas

December 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Entering the Aladdin’s cave of gifts – a shop called Velvet Moon at 79 St George’s Road, Glasgow, G3 6JA – you’ll usually find a candle burning. Owner Brenda likes to have a Melt Pool candle aflame to produce a lovely aroma in the place.

Give a Melt Pool candle gift for that warm glow of satisfaction.

The soy candles are hand made in Scotland and come in a variety of scents.

For a start you can find geranium and lavender or lemongrass and lavender. Then there’s peppermint and rosemary, Yiang Yiang, and Patchouli. Whether it is tea light sized candles, beautifully wrapped and tied with tartan ribbon, or a long lasting candle such as the cedarwood, cinnamon, cloves and orange which really brings Christmas home, you’ll find the variety of sizes and scents will provide beautiful gifts for lots of family and friends. And they won’t break the budget as they range from £5 to £15.50.

So do yourself a favour, save time get to Velvet Moon near St George’s Mansion corner.

Park cheaply in Woodlands Road or travel by the No 4 bus route. Alternatively go by low level train to Charing Cross or by underground to St George’s Cross then take a short walk to Velvet Moon to do all your important gift shopping in one stop. Choose from a vast array of gifts you won’t find on the high street or in the shopping malls.

And Brenda will wrap your presents, beautifully, too – if you wish.

Each day till Christmas, we will post one of the many, many lines of special interest Velvet Moon carries.

Velvet Moon will put a shine on your shopping this Christmas. And there are lots of coffee shops nearby too!

 

Jelly Cat provides the purrrfect gift

December 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Only ten shopping days till Christmas  so look for Jelly Cat soft toys to please someone you love.

Some of the wide selection of lovable Jelly Cat cuddly toys at Velvet Moon

Jelly Cat is a wonderful selection of quirky cuteness from the creators of the softest toys you have ever hugged, cuddled and adored. Choose from a little pink elephant or a white rabbit, a striped cat or a big highland cow among a myriad of animals. These adorable creatures are waiting in Velvet Moon for you. Having bought them, you might even keep them yourself! They are just so loveable. A Jelly Cat can make a perfect gift, is suitable for all ages and all pockets with prices ranging from £6 to £40.

So do yourself a favour, save time, get to Velvet Moon at 79 St George’s Road, Glasgow G3 6JA.

This place is a treasure trove of beautiful things and is easy to find near St George’s Mansion corner.

Park cheaply in Woodlands Road or come by the No 4 bus route. Alternatively travel by low level train to Charing Cross or by underground to St George’s Cross and take a short walk to Velvet Moon to do all your important gift shopping in one stop. Choose from a vast array of gifts you won’t find on the high street.

And Brenda will wrap your presents, beautifully, too – if you wish.

Each day till Christmas, we will post one of the many, many lines of special interest Velvet Moon carries. Velvet Moon will put a shine on your shopping this Christmas. And there are lots of coffee shops nearby too!

Store opening targetted by local protesters

December 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

A group of ‘Say No to Tesco’ campaigners staged a protest outside the company’s latest store which opened on Tuesday 10 December 2013, in Great Western  Road.

While the official opening event was happening inside the new store, protesters made their presence felt outside. Photographs by María Suárez

 

Said Group organiser Ellie Harrison: ‘It felt very important to mark the opening of the store that we campaigned so hard to stop. We wanted to show that this was going ahead against the wishes of the local community.

‘We got a positive response from a lot of passers-by who understood why we were protesting. But it was amazing how many people just seemed to drift into the shop as though they were on auto-pilot and the store had been there forever. This made me realise what a massive impact this will have on all the other shops nearby – every little sale that multi-national now makes, really will hurt them.’

The group has extended their protest to cover Scotland and has a petition on the Scottish Parliament’s website to appeal for restrictions on multi-nationals developing on the high street to the detriment – and often demise – of small local traders.

Notice for the store augmented by notice from local residents and traders.

The online petition has been augmented by other signatures gathered at various protest and public points including Tuesday’s.  The petition will be presented in the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh on Tuesday 28 January 2014. The group invites people who’ve signed it, and other supporters, to join them on the day. For more information see: https://lists.riseup.net/www/subscribe/tescogreatwesternroad

And on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.373326272803400.1073741830.345435978925763

Photographs by: María Suárez

Retiring Councillors receive farewell plaque

May 2, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

Jean McFadden who left Glasgow City Council after 41 years' service.

Of the 21 people retiring as Councillors from Glasgow City Council, around ten attended a poignant farewell  earlier this week.   Hosted by Lord Provost Bob Winter, who is, himself, standing down, it brought closure to many of the participants.

Said Jean McFadden who represented Garscadden-Scotstounhill and has served the city for 41 years: ‘Everyone felt it was a really nice touch to honour those of us leaving. Each person was presented with a personalised plaque which has the city’s coat of arms and the dates they’ve served. I have similar plaques from Glasgow Corporation but this is the only one which has my name on it.’

She has no plans to retired. Among her many ongoing activities she is an official examiner for work submitted by honours law students at Strathclyde University; she will get back to studying Advanced Italian for herself; she will mentor girls in a secondary school to help them achieve their potential; and she might go for an HGV licence!

‘I’ve always fancied driving one of those heavy goods vehicles round a tight corner!’ she said quite seriously.   These are all outwith her commitments serving on the Legal Services Clinic and the Scottish Planning and Environment Law’s editorial board among others. She has also set herself to correct fundamental errors in some newspaper archives about who did what and when in the revival of Glasgow. ‘I just want to put the record straight. I was council leader from 1979 to 1986. That is when the team decided to change the direction of the city to move it into the creative industries and the financial sector.  The minutes are there so I want the facts to be known.’

One of her future students will be former Drumchapel- Anniesland Councillor Matt Kerr, who leaves the Council to read law at Strathclyde University.  He was selected after the resignation of Steven Purcell. He also attended the Lord Provost’s farewell event and said it was a very pleasant occasion.

Councillor Alex Glass who represented Greater Pollok for 13 years, told this website: ‘The evening and the presentation of the plaques was a good way to close off my time as a Councillor.’ Latterly he had been business manager for the city, overseeing many of the negotiations which kept Glasgow’s coffers from being emptied. One of the ways he saved the city money was to recommend cutting the fresh flowers budget. ‘That saved £50,000,’ he said. ‘ Stopping newspapers for every Councillor saved another £30,000 and at least that was saved on print bills when we cut back on paperwork.’ Aged only 52, he said this will be the first time in his life he’s been made redundant and he has, so far, no job offer.  ‘I’ve work to do at home which I’ve long promised to complete for my wife,’ he said with a smile. ‘So I’ll do that and wait and see what happens. Everything is in the hands of fate,’ he commented philosophically.

Latterly a Bailie, Councillor Catherine McMaster  has served Glasgow North East for several terms and said: ‘The event was not an obituary! It was really important to have something to say you’ve been here. Our training records were also included for every Councillor was expected to have extensive training in many areas of the work we do. That is the kind of record that was ignored by the Labour Party and dismissed in our interviews with them,’ she said pointedly. She was one of the Labour Councillors who did not take it kindly that she was de-selected by the party. She admitted she was still angry with the party for deciding she was ‘past the sell by date’ – ‘that is pure ageism,’ she commented.  Her  plan is to re-commence her private practice as a psychotherapist. ‘I’ll update my accreditation first,’ she added. The leading thinker behind the celebration of Glasgow’s medieval history, which has excited much attention and creative talent, she plans to continue to use her history knowledge within her local community in Easterhouse where Provan Hall Trust operates a building considered to pre-date the Provand’s Lordship on High Street. She said that her community had been generous in their appreciation of her work for them. ‘It has been a great privilege to serve this community. I’ll leave the new team to get on with the job and hope they will work to ‘let Glasgow flourish.’  But that will depend on how many voters turn out on Thursday.’

 

 

Schools line up for Molendinar Awards

January 20, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

The third year of the Molendinar Awards marked a successful celebration of the life of Glasgow’s Patron Saint – Saint Mungo.

More than 30 schools entered with the final 12 schools being showcased at the awards presentation in the city’s Banqueting Hall.

Molendinar is the name of the burn that runs into the Clyde and it was alongside it, near what is now the High Street area, that St Mungo (who was also known as St Kentigern) is thought to have settled.

For Primary and Secondary schools, the Molendinar Awards enables children to become more aware of Glasgow’s rich cultural heritage and the vital links between the school and the neighbouring communities.

Entries ranged from posters, power point presentations and DVD animations to songs and poems.

Winners of the Molindinar Awards were: Primary 3 – 1st Barmulloch Primary, 2nd Keppoch Nursery, 3rd Greenview Learning Centre

Primary 4 – 1st St Paul’s Whiteinch, 2nd Drummore Primary, joint 3rd – St Mungo’s and Kelbourne Park Primary Schools.

Secondary School winners: 1st St Mungo’s Academy, 2nd Ashcraig Secondary, 3rd John Paul Academy.

Framed certificates were presented for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place Primary and Secondary. Winners also received a plaque to display in their school.

Bailie Jean McFadden, Executive Member for Education, is delighted by the enthusiasm shown by pupils. She said: ‘The Molendinar Awards are a tremendous opportunity for our schools. We have some very creative and talented young people as shown by the standard of entries this year. I know the judges had some very hard decisions to make. I hope the enthusiasm continues and that we will see more and more young people participating in the Molendinar Awards over the next few years.’ Glasgow City Council Leader, Councillor Gordon Matheson, joined Bailie McFadden in presenting the winning pupils with their framed certificates on Friday 13 January. He said: ‘The pupils have enjoyed all aspects of this competition.’

Other ways the Patron Saint was feted included a beautifully choreographed promenade performance by dancers from Visual Statement for shoppers at St Enoch Centre.

Dancing for a Saint's sake at St Enoch's

They told the tale of the city’s coat of arms – the Bird, the Bell, the Fish and the Tree. The medieval monk’s miracles involved, at different times, a bird, a tree and a fish. The inspirational performance by Nicola Gilmour, Brian McIntyre, Pauline McGlinchey and Cheree Thompson as the respective symbols, along with a dozen other dancers aged from 10, was a modern symphonic piece by Danny Dobbie assisted by Brian McIntyre and Wendie Reid. A movable sculpture commissioned by Visual Statement and designed by Andy Scott added an extra dimension as the dancers moved in and out and on to it.

Around 350 young people saw a performance of the tales by five Glasgow schools with a senior pupil from Lourdes Secondary being the compere, in the City Chambers.

 

Dance promotes patron saint’s festival

January 13, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

Dancers from Visual Statement company enthrall some shoppers.

The story of Glasgow is stopping shoppers in their tracks at St Enoch’s Centre. And Saturday 14 January between 12 noon and 4pm is the final chance to catch the beautifully choreographed promenade performance by dancers from Visual Statement. They are re-telling the tale of the city’s coat of arms – the Bird, the Bell, the Fish and the Tree. The inspirational performance by Nicola Gilmour, Brian McIntyre, Pauline McGlinchey and Cheree Thompson as the respective symbols, along with a dozen other dancers aged from 10, is a modern symphonic piece by Danny Dobbie assisted by Brian McIntyre and Wendie Reid. A movable sculpture commissioned by Visual Statement and designed by Andy Scott will add an extra dimension as the dancers move in and out and on to it. The music is the tranquil ‘A Little Scottish Fantasy’ by Vanessa Mae and ‘For Unto Us A Child Is Born’ by Handel. This is one of the many events during a week long celebration of St Mungo, Glasgow’s patron saint. Also known as St Kentigern, the medieval monk’s miracles involved, at different times, a bird, a tree and a fish. On Friday 13 January, around 350 young people will see a performance of the tales by five Glasgow schools with a senior pupil from Lourdes Secondary being the compere in the City Chambers. That afternoon the third Molendinar Awards will be presented to celebrate Glasgow’s local history and archaeology as seen by school children through their own local links. More than 30 schools have entered with the final 12 schools being showcased at the awards presentation in the city’s Banqueting Hall. Molendinar is the name of the burn that runs into the Clyde and it was alongside it, near what is now the High Street area, that St Mungo (St Kentigern) is thought to have settled. Framed certificates will be presented for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place in each of the three categories – Pre 5: Primary 3; Primary 4: Primary 7 and Secondary. Winners will also receive a plaque to display in their school. The Molendinar Awards project brings to the community an awareness of Glasgow’s rich cultural heritage and is designed to support schools in the work they do linked to the local and wider community. Topics schools work on include local history, local family, local developments, school history, the community, tourist Glasgow, modern life and festivals in the city. Entries range from posters, power point presentations and DVD animations to songs and poems. Bailie Jean McFadden, Executive Member for Education, is delighted by the enthusiasm shown by pupils and hopes to see more schools participating next year. She said: ‘The Molendinar Awards are a tremendous opportunity for our schools. We have some very creative and talented young people as shown by the standard of entries this year. I know the judges had some very hard decisions to make. I hope the enthusiasm continues and that we will see more and more young people participating in the Molendinar Awards over the next few years.’ Glasgow City Council Leader, Councillor Gordon Matheson, will join Bailie McFadden in presenting the winning pupils with their framed certificates on Friday. He said: ‘The pupils have enjoyed all aspects of this competition and I’m sure that they will be very excited to find out who the winners are.’