Going….going… but not quite gone!

October 11, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Joe Graham's starting point.

Joe Graham’s starting point.

There was confusion tonight about the safety of residents in the area around the Red Road flats demolition site and whether or not they would be able to return home.

A BBC television broadcast said an emergency inspection was being carried out after two of the six tower blocks failed to come down completely. The remaining unsafe structures had to be examined and consideration was being given to having them ‘pushed over’ on Monday.

This unexpected setback cast doubts on whether local residents could return to their homes on Sunday. The television report said they should consult the GHA website. But that website did not give any information on what to do.

Joe Graham captures the implosions at the base of the tower blocks.

Joe Graham captures the implosions at the base of the tower blocks.

A GHA spokesman said: ‘The original plan for today’s demolition was that 10 floors of the blocks would remain for dismantling, post blowdown, by machine. However, this did not go completely to plan. Over the next few days the contractors, Safedem, will carry out a review to determine the best way of now completing the demolition.

“Residents began moving back into their homes shortly after 6pm, just over an hour later than originally planned.

“We sincerely apologise to everyone involved for this delay and any additional inconvenience caused.’

Later the GHA spokesman added: ‘Exclusion zone has been lifted, everyone is getting back into their homes tonight.’

The tower blocks start crashing down.

The tower blocks start crashing down.

 

 

 

 

Seems to be going well...

Seems to be going well…

Seems to be all over...

Almost  all over…

Dust cloud begins to rise...

Dust cloud begins to rise…

But out of the dust - two bits of tower blocks still stand.

But out of the dust – two bits of tower blocks still stand.

Photographer Joe Graham studies photography at Glasgow Kelvin College. He was taking these shots as part of his ‘reportage’ study.  Thanks Joe for sharing your pictures of the Red Road flats blow down on Sunday 11 October 2015.

 

 

Blow down not such a breeze

October 11, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

After the blow down, parts of two of the tower blocks are still visible.

After the blow down, parts of two of the tower blocks are still visible.

All six of the infamous Red Road high flats were ‘blown down’ today but remnants of two of them remained after the explosion.  Hours after the event, no one at Glasgow Housing Association (GHA) was able to comment on whether this was intended or not. Nor did the social landlord – part of the Wheatley Group – release the normal details of how much explosive was used, how many tonnes of rubble would be created etc.

One insider, however, said that the steel structure of the building was such that four times the normal amount of explosive would have been used and the two bits of building remaining standing would have been ‘not expected.’

And by early evening it was understood that hundreds of people were being advised to ‘look at the GHA website’ to see where they might spend the night if they were unable to return to their homes because of the unsafe, remaining structures.

An emergency inspection was believed to be underway as this story

The six tower blocks before demolition.

The six tower blocks before demolition.

is being written.

Local people in their hundreds stood at various vantage points for hours to wait for the massive implosion. They were well pleased.  Cheers and a round of applause accompanied the massive cloud of dust which followed the collapse of the blocks. The dust spread over a very wide area.

Said trainee photographer Joe Graham: ‘That was quick!’ as he scrolled through his images.

Local resident Joan Flanagan said: ‘That was magic. I like big bangs and love to see things being destructed like that.’

Bobby Burns, also a local resident said: ‘That’s bitter sweet to see. It is one chapter of life closed now. But I suppose it opens a new one of re-generation for the area.’  He said he’d lived in two different tower blocks and commented: ‘They’ve both gone now. They were blown down too.’

The huge operation to clear the surrounding area of people began early on Sunday morning. ‘Two thousand five hundred people had to be moved,’ said one GHA official spokesman. ‘That takes time.’

Some resistance was expected from one householder – Tina Suffredini who chairs the local residents’ association. But when the time came, the GHA’s ‘plan B’ to have Sheriff Officers physically remove the lady from her property, was not required and she left her home of her own accord.

MSP Patricia Ferguson at the viewing site before demolition.

MSP Patricia Ferguson at the viewing site before demolition.

MSP Patricia Ferguson, who spent 11 years of her early girlhood in one of the Red Road flats said: ‘These needed to come down. I hope the new developments will bring job opportunities and community facilities and the GHA is consulting with local people to do that.’